Chris Ames 05 September 2018

London councils launch low emission zones

London councils launch low emission zones image

Two London councils have restricted nine streets to ultra low emission vehicles (ULEVs) during peak times.

The restrictions have been brought in by Hackney and Islington councils as a way of addressing pollution in the congested City Fringe area close to Old Street station.

The ULEV-only streets, which the councils said are the first of their kind in the capital, came into force on Monday (3 September).

With limited exceptions, petrol and diesel vehicles and all other vehicles emitting more than 75g/km of CO2 will be banned from the nine streets between 7 and 10am and 4 and 7pm from Monday to Friday. Vehicles permitted to use the streets during this time include all 100% electric and hydrogen vehicles and some of the least polluting hybrid vehicles.

Cllr Feryal Demirci, deputy mayor of Hackney, said: ‘Failing to act on poor air quality, which causes nearly 10,000 premature deaths across London every year, is not an option, and that’s why we’re being bolder than ever in our efforts to tackle it.

‘We’re thrilled to be launching our Ultra Low Emissions Streets - the first of their kind in the UK - which will reclaim the streets from polluting petrol and diesel vehicles, and improve the area for thousands of people every day.’

Residents and businesses with addresses and existing parking permits or vehicles with associated off-street parking in the ULEV-only streets will be exempt from the restrictions.

Non-exempt vehicles will face a Penalty Charge Notice if they enter the streets during peak hours.

The scheme is being funded from the Mayor of London’s Air Quality Fund, and the Office for Low Emission Vehicles' Go Ultra Low City Scheme.

The restrictions cover Rivington Street, Charlotte Road, Cowper Street, Singer Street, Tabernacle Street, Paul Street, Ravey Street, Willow Street and Blackall Street.

This story first appeared on Transport Network

Slavery in supply chains image

Slavery in supply chains

Tiffany Cloynes and Clare Hardy explore what responsibility councils may have in the future to eliminate slavery and human trafficking in their supply chains.
Open letter to Boris Johnson image

Open letter to Boris Johnson

The MJ's editor Heather Jameson asks the new PM a simple question: do you want to fund local government or do you want to scale back services to the basics?
Highways jobs

Senior Traffic Engineer

East Riding of Yorkshire Council
£32,029 - £34,788 per annum
Currently seeking an enthusiastic and experienced individual to manage our Traffic Team. East Riding of Yorkshire
Recuriter: East Riding of Yorkshire Council

Youth and Community Based Commissioner- Colchester and Tendring

Essex County Council
£18117 - £19106.0 per month
Annual Salary JNC SCP 3 - Unqualified £18,117JNC SCP 6 - Qualified £19,106 We are currently seeking a Youth and Community Based Commissioner to suppo England, Essex, Colchester
Recuriter: Essex County Council

Networks Technician

Essex County Council
£24001.0 - £28280 per annum
Technology Services is focused on ensuring current and future investment in technology to maximise the opportunities to support ECC from a technology England, Essex, Basildon
Recuriter: Essex County Council

Youth Worker x7

Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council
£18,795 - £19,945 per annum
Looking for a Youth Worker who can meet the needs and aspirations of young people and deliver high quality Youth Work. Sandwell, West Midlands
Recuriter: Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council

Customer Specialist

Essex County Council
£20001.0 - £22220.0 per annum
Essex County Council (ECC) are currently recruiting for a Customer specialist within the Technical Processing and Optimisation Team. The Team is respo England, Essex, Chelmsford
Recuriter: Essex County Council

Local Government News

Latest issue - Local Goverrnemnt News

This issue of Local Government News explores how councils can tackle modern slavery and trafficking in their supply chains, finds out more about Cambridge's first cohousing scheme and the launch of a new project to build a shared service pattern library for local government.

This issue also contains a special focus on children's services and how councils are protecting children following local safeguarding children boards being abolished.

Register for your free magazine